Health Worker Preferences for Community-based Health Insurance Payments Mechanisms: A Discrete Choice Experiment

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This study is about the development of community-based health insurance (CBI) schemes in Burkina Faso. In early 2004, the insurance (CBI) scheme, Assurance Maladie à Base Communautiare (AMBC), was introduced in Nouna district, Burkina Faso. Under CBI schemes, members of a community, often defined by geographical proximity or through employment based relationships, pool resources in order to provide support for covering health expenditures.

Health worker preferences for community-based health Insurance payment mechanisms: A discrete choice experiment

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Two important challenges in establishing and sustaining community-based insurance (CBI) schemes are low rates of community member enrolment and high lapse rates. These factors lead to low CBI coverage which in turn results in low levels of revenue for the risk carrier and limited risk-pooling, which leave CBI schemes financially and organisationally vulnerable to unexpected changes in incomes or high disease incidence.

Health mutuals' impact on behaviours for demand of health insurance in Cameroun

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This study examines the impact of micro health insurance on the demand for health care based on a representative survey of 317 households in the Health District in Mbalmayo central region in Cameroon. Authors show that evaluated schemes are plagued by adverse selection, which questions the impact of the membership in health mutuals on health care utilization.

Health insurance participation: Experimental evidence from Kenya

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This paper describes the main findings of a field experiment offering health insurance in Kenya. It offers a discussion of the participation in a composite health insurance product offered to tea farmers living in the district of Nyeri, Kenya, and belonging to the Wananchi Savings and Credit Cooperative Society. This paper documents several aspects of the study. First, it provides details of the population under study, with implications for the generalisations of experimental results from this to other contexts.

Health Emergencies: How do the Poor Pay?

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How do the poor in India deal with medical emergencies? MicroSave’s India Focus Note 93 describes how low-income families in India deal with medical emergencies in the absence of quality public health care facilities. It advocates health insurance as an affordable alternative for low-income families. Poor people in India cope with medical emergencies by using savings, loans from various sources, and by pawning or selling assets. The expenditure to meet a major health shock often pushes low-income families into distress.

Evaluation of the first year results: Fonkoze’s Kore W natural catastrophe insurance for Haitian micro-entrepreneurs

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In 2011, Fonkoze, in partnership with its insurance company MiCRO, introduced Kore W - an innovative new product to protect Haitian microloan clients from the devastating effects of natural disasters. Through the cancellation of loan balances and disbursement of emergency payouts, Kore W helps clients recover quickly after being impacted by floods, hurricanes, high winds, landslides, or earthquakes. 100% of Fonkoze’s microcredit clients pay a small premium for their coverage which amounts to roughly 55% of the cost of the product to Fonkoze.

Emerging practices in mobile microinsurance

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This paper outlines opportunities for leveraging the mobile channel, including mobile money, to deliver microinsurance. It also provides a global landscape of attempts to do so from around the world and develops new ideas for collaboration between stakeholders from the mobile and the insurance industry. The statement of this paper is that the mobile platform, including mobile money, can be used as a tool to reduce the costs of microinsurance and to help it to scale. Assets controlled by mobile network operators (MNOs) can help insurers reach customers in low-premium environments.

Doing the Math: Health Microinsurance in Maharashtra, India

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The MILK project partnered with the global insurance intermediary MicroEnsure to study the extent to which a health microinsurance product covering inpatient care offered value to clients in terms of reduced spending and improved access. There is strong evidence that insurance can reduce the out-of-pocket spending for families when large health crises hit, features, exactly how benefits are delivered, and the socio-economic characteristics of the target community.

Doing the math: Cashless funeral insurance in Colombia

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In September 2011 the MILK team partnered with MAPFRE Colombia in Bogota to study how policyholders and non-policyholders of MAPFRE’s CODENSA “Seguro Exequial” funeral insurance policy cope financially with the death of a family member. They implemented MILK’s Client Math methodology to better understand the financial tools available to and used by those with and without insurance and to conduct a quantitative assessment of the plausible gains to having insurance.

Doing the Math with Property Insurance in Ghana

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In January 2012 the MILK Project designed a Client Math study in partnership with MicroEnsure-Ghana and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ). The study was centered on the role of the insurance coverage in how insured entreprenuers coped with this shock, and thus explores the value of this type of coverage. This study shows in the case of Obra Pa the debt relief component of the insurance appears to offer value and few loans of uninsured clients were restructured.

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