Can insurers improve healthcare quality? Evidence from a Community Microinsurance Scheme in India

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This study investigates whether microinsurers can help improve the quality of healthcare, and not just its price. Indian patients who had a caesarean section, appendectomy, hysterectomy, or abdominal hernia surgery were studied. The authors compare indicators of facility’s infrastructure, doctor’s qualification and knowledge, process of care, and patient satisfaction. Two thirds of insured patients contacted the insurer about their choice of provider.

Assessment of Health: Microinsurance Outcomes in the Northern Areas, Pakistan

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This study assesses whether the HMI program reduces household vulnerability to health risks and if so, how. The research investigates changes in household health risk management behavior and health-seeking behavior to determine if households that enroll in the health microinsurance achieve improved financial and health outcomes as a result of using the insurance. The evaluation also probes for changes at the hospital level, such as new levels of hospital utilisation, costs, and revenues that could lead to changes in the quality of care offered.

Transforming community health funds in Tanzania into viable social health insurance scheme: The challenge ahead , in Improving access through effective health financing

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In the context of preparing the “Health Promotion and System Strengthening” (HPSS) project funded by the Swiss Government, the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) carried out an analysis of the CHF structures in Dodoma Region. This analysis revealed a number of limitations and structural problems for the CHFs, specifically with respect to design, enrolment, servicing, and sustainability of the schemes.

Microinsurance to the Last, the Least, and the Lost: A case study in rural India

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Until about 2007, microinsurance in India was a state-run initiative with limited scope and coverage. However, as an initiative developed by Financial Inclusion Network and Operations Ltd. (FINO) and ICICI Lombard General Insurance Company, biometric-based smart card insurance was offered to the target group in rural India.

Microinsurance to the last, the least and the lost

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The report sheds light on technology that has enabled the vast scope and coverage of microinsurance in India. “The technology included in Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojna to the rural population has made cashless and paperless transactions possible with easy evaluation and monitoring, in addition to ensuring secure processing,” says Prathima Rajan, Celent Analyst and author of the report. The report will help inform insurers that are intending to offer microinsurance or health insurance in emerging markets.

Community-based microinsurance: Innovations on the education of the poor to manage their risks

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In the context of preparing the “Heath Promotion and System Strengthening” (HPSS) project funded by the Swiss Government, the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) carried out an analysis of the CHF structures in Dodoma Region. This analysis revealed a number of limitations and structural problems for the CHFs, specifically with respect to design, enrolment, servicing, and sustainability of the schemes.

Can we assume that people understand insurance principles? : The case of India and Nepal, in Bulletin 120: Improving Access through effective health financing

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When approaching people at the “base of the pyramid” (BOP) in Low-Income Countries (LIC) with the idea of insurance, the first challenge is to establish a basis for communication. The question that arises is whether they understand insurance principles. This issue was examined by analysing replies to a series of questions in household surveys that were conducted in several locations in India and in Nepal.

The social dilemma of microinsurance: A framed field experiment on free-riding and coordination in microcredit groups

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This paper analyses free-riding and coordination problems in microinsurance. Authors model demand for health insurance in microcredit groups that typically share risk through joint liability as a social dilemma. Less risk averse clients are tempted to free-ride and forgo individual insurance while the more risk averse face a coordination problem. Group insurance binds both types to the social optimum. Microinsurance games played with microcredit clients in Tanzania confirm the free-riding hypothesis and demonstrate limited coordination failures under individual insurance.

Succeeding at microinsurance through differentiation innovation and partnership

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The report examines the progress of microinsurance to date and highlights the importance of differentiation, innovation and partnership in its success. Accenture argue that those attempting to enter the market must be prepared to see business through "an entirely new business paradigm", but that the necessary innovation can provide valuable lessons even to traditional carriers. The report also features Accenture Development Partnership's work with MicroEnsure implementing health microinsurance for lower income communities in Tanzania.

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