The pulse of a silently transforming India: A socio-economic profile of the micro(health) insurance target population

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This paper analyses the results of a 2005 EU-India Economic Cross Cultural Programme Household Survey. The author gives insight into this segment’s changing needs and how microinsurance schemes can be designed better for a population in continual flux.

Micro health insurance: The quest for a balance between different interests of healthcare providers, clients and insurers

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The three partners in the equation of health insurance are the clients, the providers of care and the insurers. Each of the stakeholders aims at different objectives: providers of healthcare seek to deliver health services, and each provider focuses on those services that it has capacity to deliver. The objective of insurers is to ensure that expenditure levels will not exceed the income. And the objective of clients is to obtain affordable and good quality services that are relevant in their context, through a process that they consider as fair.

Can insurance increase financial risk?: The curious case of health insurance in China

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The authors analyse the effect of insurance on the probability of an individual incurring 'high' annual health expenses using data from three household surveys. All come from China, a country where providers are paid fee-for-service according to a schedule that encourages the overprovision of high-tech care and who are only lightly regulated. The authors define annual spending as 'high' if it exceeds a threshold of local average income and as 'catastrophic' if it exceeds a threshold of the household's own per capita income.

Incidence of illness among resource-poor households: Evidence from five locations in India

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This study examines the association between household attributes and perceived morbidity within resource-poor house holds (HHs) in India at five locations. This presents an innovation compared to most epidemiological studies, which focus on associations between the incidence of an illness and characteristics of the ill person. The findings showed that attributes of the unit household, including type of house, income, education and size, have significant effects on IIH, variability in IIH cannot solely be explained by age and gender of HH members.

Health microinsurance schemes: Diversity, innovation and trends. A national review 2009

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The objective of the present report is to provide an across-the-country review of the various on-going health micro-insurance schemes targeting the disadvantaged groups of Indian society. To this day, there are only a few fully documented initiatives all over the world. India may become a new reference with the present work reviewing 100 on-going health micro-insurance schemes spread all over the country.

Financial inclusion opportunities for micro-health insurance in Nepal: An exploratory analysis of health incidence, costs and willingness to pay in Dhading and Banke districts of Nepal

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This report is based information collected in two districts of Nepal (Banke and Dhading) in early 2009 and concerns the launch of community-based micro health insurance units for members of Nirdhan and DEPROSC, two grassroots microfinance NGOs. The study entailed a household survey of 2,008 households, 40 focus group discussions (with potential beneficiaries), in addition to 51 key informant interviews with healthcare providers. The purpose of the study was to collect the date needed for designing and pricing an insurance plan.

Costs and benefits of health microinsurance premium loans and linkages with health providers: CARD’s experience in the Philippines

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Focusing on the impact of the MAHP (Microfinance and Health Protection) services on CARD (Center for Agriculture and Rural Development, Mutually Reinforcing Institutions), this paper explores the hypothesis that MFIs can feasibly offer health-related services that "pay for themselves" via a combination of financial revenues and non-financial benefits that indirectly improve the MFI’s financial position.

Can micro health insurance reduce poverty? Evidence from Bangladesh

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This paper examines the impact of micro health insurance on poverty reduction in rural areas of Bangladesh. The research is based on household level primary data collected from the operating areas of the Grameen Bank during 2006. A number of outcome measures relating to poverty status are considered, these include household income, stability of household income via food sufficiency and ownership of non-land assets, and also the probability of being above or below the poverty line.

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