Impact assessment of health microinsurance for the social protection of informal workers: A qualitative study for the case of Kenya

compucorp_admin's picture

The aim of the author’s field research was to assess the impact of health microinsurance on the working poor in Nairobi, Kenya. The analysis is mainly based on qualitative expert interviews with microinsurance clients in order to gain an in depth understanding of the benefits and shortcomings that the utilization of health microinsurance has had for the lives of informal workers in Kenya. The focus of the analysis is on the potential improvement of social protection of informal workers through health microinsurance.

Health microinsurance: A comparison of four policy-run schemes in Latin America

compucorp_admin's picture

This paper presents, analyses and compares four case studies performed in Latin American between 2001 and 2003 for GTZ’s InfoSure project (see Appendix). Three of the studies deal with public microinsurance schemes in Bolivia, Peru and Paraguay, and the fourth case refers to the teacher welfare plan in El Salvador.

Health Microinsurance: A Comparative Study of Three Examples in Bangladesh

compucorp_admin's picture

The health care system in Bangladesh is mainly urban-based, elite-biased and curative-orientated. Even though nearly 75% of the population lives in rural areas, the public and private health care development has concentrated mainly in urban areas. The standard and the level of health care provided by the public sector is inadequate due to low investment, bureaucratic mismanagement, and the lack of equipment, facilities, and trained medical professionals.

The Financial Impact of Formal Health Insurance Schemes: Evidence from Uganda

compucorp_admin's picture

With only one licensed health insurer targeted at the informal segment, Uganda relies heavily on out-of-pocket payments for health care financing. Financial consequences are severe in the short and the long-term. Medical bills are larger than people’s ability-to-pay, one feels less financially secure and uses other (expensive) measures to cover health care expenses. Many households are forced to borrow from the community for which the long-term impact can be disastrous.

Willingness to pay for health insurance among rural and poor persons: Field evidence from seven microhealth insurance units in India

compucorp_admin's picture

This study, conducted in India in 2005, provides evidence on Willingness to pay (WTP), gathered through a unidirectional (descending) bidding game among 3024 households (HH) in seven locations where micro health insurance units are in operation. Insured persons reported slightly higher WTP values than uninsured. About two-thirds of the sample agreed to pay at least 1%, about half the sample was willing to pay at least 1.35%, 30% was willing to pay about 2.0% of annual HH income as health insurance premium.

Social capital and microinsurance: Insights from the field evidence in India

compucorp_admin's picture

This article examines the linkages between social capital and microinsurance using evidences obtained from a 2005 household survey conducted across several locations in India. The current body of literature suggests that micro health insurance schemes are in fact able to mobilize social capital for the purpose of encouraging voluntary affiliation of resource-poor persons operating within the space of the informal economy.

Micro health insurance in India: Pointers for progress

compucorp_admin's picture

One cannot exclude the possibility that insurers and others, insufficiently aware of clients' priorities, seem to misinterpret low demand as reflecting low willingness to pay, ignoring the unattractive value proposition of the main product and the devastating impact on the demand side of cherry picking. One can wonder if those who are interested in making insurance work for the poor in India might be stuck in a vicious cycle, which looks like this: poor products - low demand - low willingness to pay - lowering of premiums - further worsening of insurance product or service.

Demystifying micro health insurance package design - Choosing healthplans all together (Chat)

compucorp_admin's picture

This article examines the utilization of a simulation exercise known as Choosing All Health Insurance (CHAT). As a decision tool, this exercise allows variably educated resource-poor populations who are inexperienced with health insurance to select health benefits that they perceive to be relevant. CHAT was adapted to developmental context of India through the project "Strengthening Micro Health Insurance Units for the Poor" (2005-2006).

Cost of illness: Evidence from a study in five resource-poor locations in India

compucorp_admin's picture

In India, health services are funded largely through out-of-pocket spending (OOPS). The objective of this article is to provide data on the cost of an illness episode and parameters affecting cost. The data was obtained through a household survey carried out in 2005 in five locations among resource-poor persons in rural or slum India. The analysis is based on self-reported illness episodes and their costs. The study is based on 3,531 households (representing 17,323 persons) and 4,316 illness episodes.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Health insurance